Public Education in The 1960's
school_2.jpg

Americans in the 1960s became aware that the nation was suffering from a shortage of citizens whose education and training were sufficient to meet the technological challenges of modern society. The gap between the learning needs of the country and the capacity of the American educational system to meet those needs was at a crisis point at the beginning of the decade, and the resulting demands for more and better education forced reassessment of every segment of the teaching-learning process.
(More Info)


the_little_rock_nine.jpg

The Little Rock Nine was a group of African-American students who were enrolled in Little Rock Central High School in 1957. The ensuing Little Rock Crisis, in which the students were initially prevented from entering the racially segregated Arkansas governor Orval Faubus
school by , and then attended after the intervention of President Eisenhower, is considered to be one of the most important events in the African American Civil Rights Movement. On their first day of school, troops from the Arkansas National Guard would not let them enter the school and they were followed by mobs making threats to lynch. -1957 (More Info)

Ruby_Bridges.jpg

When she was 6 years old, the parents of Ruby Bridges responded to a call from the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People(NAACP) and volunteered her to participate in the integration of the New Orleans School system. She is known as the first African-American child to attend an all-white elementary school in the South. In 1960, Ruby Bridges' parents were informed by officials from the NAACP that she was one of only six other African-American students to pass the test. Ruby would be the only African-American student to attend the William Frantz School, near her home.
(More Info)


school3.jpg


An attempt to deal with the increasing demands of blacks for equal rights came in 1964 when President Lyndon Baines Johnson asked for and received the most comprehensive civil-rights act to date; the act specifically prohibited discrimination in voting, education, and the use of public facilities. For the first time since the Supreme Court ruled on segregation in public schools in 1954, the federal government had a means of enforcing desegregation; Title VI of the act barred the use of federal funds for segregated programs and schools. In 1964 only two southern states (Tennessee and Texas) had more than 2% of their black students enrolled in integrated schools. Because of Title VI, about 6% of the black students in the South were in integrated schools by the next year. (More info)
school4.jpg(More Info)














Rebecca Cray